Press Room

Key Figures

  • 21 press releases & highlights
  • 16 media

Synthesis of Vinylene-Linked Two-Dimensional Conjugated Polymers via the Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons Reaction

TUD press release.

Interest in linear (1D) conjugated polymers has significantly increased in recent decades due to their semiconducting properties and promising applications in organic optoelectronics. 2D conjugated polymers (2D CPs) consisting of multi-strands of linear conjugated polymers have been the dream of synthetic targets for several decades. The synthesis of 2D CPs with fully vinylene-linked backbones still lacks effective protocols to generate crystalline polymer materials. Vinylene-linked 2D CPs provide high chemical and thermal stabilities as well as complete π-conjugation over the whole 2D polymer framework, making these materials highly attractive for various applications, such as in optoelectronics, spintronics, and energy storage.


Le graphène comme détective pour élucider l’auto-assemblage moléculaire

CNRS Alsace press release.

Des chercheurs du Laboratoire de nanochimie de l’Institut de science et d’ingénierie supramoléculaires (ISIS | CNRS Unistra), en collaboration avec l’Université Humboldt de Berlin et DWI – Institut Leibniz pour les matériaux interactifs/Université technique d’Aix-la-Chapelle (Allemagne), ont démontré que des dispositifs de graphène peuvent être utilisés pour suivre en temps réel la dynamique de l’auto-assemblage moléculaire à l’interface solide/liquide. Ces résultats ont été publiés dans la revue Nature.


Graphene as a detective to unravel molecular self-assembly

IRIS Adlershof press release.

Researchers from Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, the DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials, and RWTH Aachen University (Germany), in collaboration with the University of Strasbourg & CNRS (France), have demonstrated that graphene devices can be used to monitor in real time the dynamics of molecular self-assembly at the solid/liquid interface. Their results have been published in Nature Communications.


Le graphène comme détective pour élucider l’auto-assemblage moléculaire

UNISTRA press release.

Des chercheurs du Laboratoire de nanochimie de l’Institut de science et d’ingénierie supramoléculaires (Isis, Université de Strasbourg/CNRS), en collaboration avec l’Université Humboldt de Berlin et DWI-Institut Leibniz pour les matériaux interactifs/Université technique d’Aix-la-Chapelle (Allemagne), ont démontré que des dispositifs de graphène peuvent être utilisés pour suivre en temps réel la dynamique de l’auto-assemblage moléculaire à l’interface solide/liquide. Ces résultats ont été publiés dans la revue Nature Communications.


Graphene as a detective to unravel molecular self-assembly

ISIS press release.

Researchers from the University of Strasbourg & CNRS (France), in collaboration with Humboldt University of Berlin and DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials/RWTH Aachen University (Germany), have demonstrated that graphene devices can be used to monitor in real time the dynamics of molecular self-assembly at the solid/liquid interface. Their results have been published in Nature Communications.


Le graphène comme détective pour élucider l’auto-assemblage moléculaire

ISIS press release.

Des chercheurs du Laboratoire de nanochimie de l’Institut de science et d’ingénierie supramoléculaires (Université de Strasbourg/CNRS), en collaboration avec l’Université Humboldt de Berlin et DWI – Institut Leibniz pour les matériaux interactifs/Université technique d’Aix-la-Chapelle (Allemagne), ont démontré que des dispositifs de graphène peuvent être utilisés pour suivre en temps réel la dynamique de l’auto-assemblage moléculaire à l’interface solide/liquide. Ces résultats ont été publiés dans la revue Nature Communications.


Graphene as a detective to unravel molecular self-assembly

Highlight in Nature Research Device & Materials Engineering Community.

Researchers from the University of Strasbourg & CNRS (France), in collaboration with Humboldt University of Berlin and DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials/RWTH Aachen University (Germany), have demonstrated that graphene devices can be used to monitor in real time the dynamics of molecular self-assembly at the solid/liquid interface. Their results have been published in Nature Communications.


ULTIMATE-1st Progress Meeting & Workshop Hosted by TUD (Online Meeting)

TUD and cfaed press releases.

On May 11th and 12th, the ULTIMATE-1st Progress Meeting & Workshop on how to overcome blackouts & scientific storytelling and ULTIMATE Early-Stage Researchers(ESR)’ presentation took place online, organized by ULTIMATE project and TU Dresden (Dr. Renhao Dong/Prof. Xinliang Feng/Prof. Gianaurelio Cuniberti).


Broad spectrum – Novel hybrid material proves an efficient photodetector

cfaed, HZDR, EurekAlert!, NWA, Phys.org and ScienceDaily press releases.

Digital cameras as well as many other electronic devices need light-sensitive sensors. In order to cater for the increasing demand for optoelectronic components of this kind, industry is searching for new semiconductor materials. They are not only supposed to cover a broad range of wavelengths but should also be inexpensive. A hybrid material, developed in Dresden, fulfils both these requirements. Himani Arora, a physics PhD student at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), demonstrated that this metal-organic framework can be used as a broadband photodetector. As it does not contain any cost-intensive raw materials, it can be produced inexpensively in bulk.


Metal-organic semiconductor photodetector has 400 to 1575 nm spectral detection range

Laser Focus World press release.

To help satisfy the increasing demand for digital cameras and other optoelectronic components, industry is searching for new photodetecting semiconductor materials, which ideally should cover a broad range of wavelengths while being low in cost. A new hybrid material, developed at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR; Dresden, germany), fulfills both these requirements. Himani Arora, a physics PhD student, demonstrated that a metal-organic framework can be used as a broadband photodetector. As it does not contain any cost-intensive raw materials, it can be produced inexpensively in bulk.


MOF-based Broadband Photodetector

Optics & Photonics News press release.

Semiconductor photodetectors have found a home in devices large and small, ranging from the smartphone camera in your pocket to the imaging instrumentation on the Hubble Space Telescope. But the high costs of processing traditional semiconductor materials have led researchers to search for cheaper alternatives.


Novel Material for an Efficient Photodetector

PhotonicsViews press release.

In the last twenty years, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have become a coveted material system. So far, these highly porous substances, up to 90 percent of which are composed of empty space, have largely been used to store gases, for cata­lysis or to slowly release drugs in the human body. “The metal-organic framework compound developed at TU Dresden comprises an organic material integrated with iron ions,” explains Artur Erbe, head of the Transport in Nano­structures group at HZDR’s Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research. “The special thing about it is that the framework forms super­imposed layers with semi­conducting properties, which makes it poten­tially interesting for opto­electronic appli­cations.” The group had the idea of using the new semi­conducting two-dimensional MOF as a photo­detector.


International Training Network „ULTIMATE“ starts

DWI press release.

The International Training Network "ULTIMATE", funded by the European Union, began its work with a kick-off meeting on 1 October. ULTIMATE stands for "Bottom-Up generation of atomicalLy precise syntheTIc 2D MATerials for high performance in energy and Electronic applications". The ULTIMATE network consists of universities and research institutes in eight European countries with a common goal: The promotion of young talents for strong research and development in the field of so-called synthetic 2-dimensional materials (S2DM) in Europe.


International Training Network „ULTIMATE“ geht an den Start

DWI press release.

Mit einem Kick-off Meeting hat am 1. Oktober das von der Europäischen Union geförderte International Training Network “ULTIMATE“ seine Arbeit aufgenommen. ULTIMATE steht für “Bottom-Up generation of atomicalLy precise syntheTIc 2D MATerials for high performance in energy and Electronic applications”. Das Netzwerk von ULTIMATE besteht aus Universitäten und Forschungsinstituten acht europäischer Länder, die ein gemeinsames Ziel haben: Die Förderung junger Talente für eine starke Forschung und Entwicklung im Bereich sogenannter synthetischer 2-dimensionaler-Materialien (S2DM) in Europa.


Ultimate, le réseau européen des jeunes talents de demain

UNISTRA press release.

Lancé le 1er octobre 2019 pour 4 ans, le réseau Ultimate rassemble différents partenaires européens parmi lesquels l’Université de Strasbourg. Objectif : faire éclore une nouvelle génération de leaders scientifiques en mesure de répondre à des enjeux sociétaux majeurs comme le bien-être, la santé et la sécurité des citoyens européens.